225 results for “Chicago, Illinois”

Woman with child in Union Station

A woman and child sit in the waiting room of Chicago's Union Station, 1948.

Creator
Esther Bubley
Date
1948
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Transportation
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Eunice Tietjens

Eunice Hammond Tietjens (1884-1944) poses in a robe that suggests her interest in the cultures of Asia. Tietjens was long associated with the literary and artistic circle around Harriet Monroe's Poetry Magazine. The daughter of a prominent family, she had an unconventional education in Europe, traveled to Japan, China, and the South Pacific as an adult, and developed an interest in eastern philosophies and religions. At different times she was a poet, novelist, journalist, author of children's books, lecturer, and editor.

Subjects
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
People
Tietjens, Eunice
Haymarket Monument, Waldheim Cemetery

A monument to four anarchist labor leaders executed in Chicago on November 11, 1887. After a trial that is generally considered a miscarriage of justice, the men were convicted of killing police with a bomb. The words at the base of the statue are those of Albert Parsons, “The day will come when our silence will be more powerful than the voices you are throttling today.” Other important labor and radical leaders, including Emma Goldman, chose to be buried near this monument.

Creator
Weinert, Albert
Subjects
Anarchism
Labor unions
Radicalism
Visions of history
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Sexual Reform on a Scientific Basis

Cover of the literary magazine Earth published in Wheaton, Illinois. Magnus Hirschfeld, an openly gay German physician, was a long-time advocate of human rights for sexual minorities. The article appeared around the time Hirschfeld was lecturing in Chicago.

Creator
Hirschfield, Magnus
Date
1931
Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Homosexuality
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Is Free Love Possible?

An advertisement for a debate on free love at the Dill Pickle Club.

Date
1930
Subjects
Advertisements
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Gender and society
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Sherwood Anderson, "Jack Jones--The Pickler."

In this article from the Chicago Daily News, the novelist Sherwood Anderson describes the diverse audience at the Dill Pickle Club: “The street car conductor sits on a bench beside the college professor, the literary critic, the earnest young wife, who hungers for culture, and the hobo.”

Creator
Sherwood Anderson
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Composite of Chicago

A view of Chicago showing ships in the harbor. Surrounding the cityscape are images of prominent buildings. The city's motto “Urbs in Horto” is surrounded by symbolic images.

Date
1857
Subjects
Advertisements
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Dill Pickle Club House and Chapel

A handbill advertises three plays at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club. An inset map shows artists' studios nearby. The plays touched on social and political issues including labor conflict, abortion, drug use, and Irish nationalism.

Date
1927
Subjects
Advertisements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Strikes
Theater
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Demonstrate for Adequate Cash Relief, Chicago, 1936

American workforce was unemployed. Many struggled alone, feeling isolated and disempowered. In Chicago and other large industrial cities, unemployed councils gave voice to the frustrations of the victims of the Depression. Often organized by radicals, the councils demanded increases in relief payments, fought evictions, and illegally turned on gas and electric supplies to poor families cut off by utility companies. The Chicago Commons settlement house worked with the Socialist Party affiliated Illinois Workers Alliance to protest a reduction in relief payments.

Creator
Illinois Workers Alliance
Date
1936
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Places
Illinois
Sharecropper, cover of _New Anvil,_ May-June 1940

Jack Conroy, a worker and proletarian writer born in a coal mining camp in Missouri, moved to Chicago in 1938, where he worked on the Illinois Writers Project and edited the New Anvil, a small literary magazine, with Nelson Algren.

Creator
de Graff, Stanley
Date
1940
Subjects
Literature
Working class
People
Conroy, Jack