26 results for “Canada”

Canada Day 1988 Voyageur Cup

A group of Canadians, some dressed as Voyageurs, carry a large canoe of the type used in the fur trade. Canada Day commemorates the 1867 British North America Act that united all different British colonies into the “Dominion of Canada.”

Creator
Noel, Lynn
Date
1988
Subjects
Fur trade
Visions of history
Places
Canada
Ontario
Liberty Line

Reproduced in a 1904 history of the Underground Railroad, this advertisement from an abolitionist periodical of 1844 offers free travel to Canada for those “who may wish to improve their health and circumstances.” The “Liberty Line” was not a real railroad, but a network of sympathetic northerners who helped escaped slaves flee to Canada were slavery had been abolished.

Date
1904
Subjects
Canada
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Canadiska Västern: den Sista Bästa Västern

A young man wipes his brow as if resting from hard work. In the background, symbols of agriculture and industry stretch out toward a distant mountain range. During the early 20th century, the government of Canada advertised in many countries of Europe hoping to recruit settlers to farm the prairie provinces, and work in its growing industries. The recruitment campaign helped to bring over 1.5 million immigrants to Canada during the first decade of the century.

Creator
Canada. Department of Interior.
Date
1910
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Places
Canada
City of Industry, Hamilton, Ontario, 2007

A steel mill releases smoke and flames into the sky above Hamilton, Ontario. A working class neighborhood is visible in the foreground bordering the industrial plant. Since the late 19th century Hamilton has been one of Canada's major industrial centers and home to an activist labor movement. Despite a shift to service industries, it remains home to Canada's two largest steel mills.

Creator
Walsh, Chris P.
Date
2007
Subjects
Industry
Places
Canada
Ontario
Underground Routes to Canada

Map showing routes used by African Americans fleeing slavery in the American South to free states in the North and to Canada. Before the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, African Americans who escaped slavery could live and work in relative freedom in northern states, although they usually did not have full political equality. After 1850 many of these Americans moved on to Canada where slavery had been abolished in 1834.

Date
1899
Subjects
Emancipation
Slavery
Underground Railroad
Places
Canada
Capture of Louis Riel by the Scouts Armstrong and Howie, May 15, 1885

Louis Riel was a Métis leader who headed a provisional government in opposition to the Canadian government in 1885. The “Riel Rebellion” was defeated militarily and Riel was convicted of treason and executed.

Date
1885
Subjects
Metis
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Places
Canada
Saskatchewan
People
Riel, Louis, 1844-1885
Emancipation Parade in Windsor, Ontario

In the 1930s residents of Windsor, Ontario, began celebrating Britain's 1833 Emancipation Act, which officially banned slavery in Canada and other parts of the British Empire.

Date
1952
Subjects
Emancipation
Places
Canada
Ontario
Plain Crees driving buffaloes into a pound

This illustration accompanies Henry Hind's description of how Cree Indians captured buffalo for slaughter. In the distance a circular “pound” or corral is visible.

Date
1860
Subjects
Cree Indians
Hunting
Indians of North America
Places
Canada
Manitoba
Major General Frederick Middleton

Major General Frederick Middleton led the Canadian forces against the Northwest Rebellion led by Louis Riel. Middleton was a long-serving officer in the British imperial armed forces. He he served in campaigns against the Maori of New Zealand and the 1857 rebellion in India. This image from a pictorial account of the Riel Rebellion portrays Middleton and his officers as the zenith of imperial order. In reality, the Canadian soldiers he led into battle were poorly trained and unprepared for actual combat.

Date
1885
Subjects
Empire
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Places
Canada
Saskatchewan
The Looting of the Old Town of Battleford

During the 1880s communities in Canada's western prairies rebelled against a plan to extend a transcontinental railroad through their territory. Descendants of American Indians and French settlers, these “Métis” communities wanted to preserve their autonomy from the Anglo-Canadians who dominated the central government. This illustration justifies the military campaign against the Metis by depicting them in stereotypical ways as drunken, lazy, and violent.

Date
1885
Subjects
Indians of North America
Metis
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Places
Canada
Saskatchewan