11 results for “1886”

Map of Chicago in 1830 (published in 1886)

Published an 1886 history of Chicago, this map recalls a time when the city was a frontier settlement. Visible on the map are the homes and businesses of early residents as well as indications of landmarks of 1886. Maps like these suggested the rapid changes taking place in American cities during the 19th century.

Creator
Andreas, A. T. (Alfred Theodore), 1839-1900
Date
1886
Subjects
Mapping
Urbanization
Visions of history
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Attention Workingmen! Achtung Arbeiter!

This bilingual broadside advertised a meeting in Chicago's Haymarket Square in 1886. An explosion near the end of the rally resulted in at least eleven deaths and dozens of injuries. Though the person responsible for the bombing was never known, eight anarchists were arrested and put on trial. The purpose of the meeting was to protest a conflict at the McCormick Reaper Works a day earlier in which police shot and killed six workers.

Date
1886
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Immigration
Working class
Anarchismus

This book was written by the author while in prison awaiting execution for his participation in the Chicago Haymarket Square riot. Albert Parsons was executed on November 11, 1887. Anarchismus is the German translation of Parsons' work, published by his wife Lucy. Only 300 copies of the English version of the book were circulated, the rest being confiscated by police. The German-language version, however, seems to have circulated freely among Chicago's large German speaking population.

Creator
Parsons, Albert R.
Date
1887
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Memorial Image of Louis Riel

A memorial to Metis leader Louis Riel who was executed by Canadian authorities on the charges of murder and treason. The imagery of cabins and a teepee suggests the close relationship between the Metis and American Indians on the Canadian Great Plains.

Date
1886
Subjects
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Visions of history
Places
Canada
Manitoba
People
Riel, Louis David
Frontispiece to _The Poet Scout: A Book of Song and Story_

Jack W. Crawford (1847-1917), known as “Captain Jack, the Poet Scout,” published his first book of poetry in 1879, republished in subsequent editions. Crawford's poetry recounts tales of his adventures in the west.

Creator
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917
Date
1886
Subjects
Poetry
Places
West (U.S.)
People
Crawford, Jack, 1847-1917
Section of Du Pratz's Map of Louisiana, 1757

The 1757 book A History of Louisiana by Antoine Le Page Du Pratz was among the few books carried with the Lewis & Clark expedition across the North American continent. Du Pratz had lived in present-day Louisiana and Mississippi in the early 1700s and his book described geographic and natural features of the region, including second hand accounts of travels deep into the Great Plains. This section of Du Pratz's map of central North America appeared in a history of Chicago from the 1880s.

Date
1886
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Louisiana
Mississippi River Valley
Representation of Life in a Cow Camp

The book from which this image is taken established Siringo's fame as the first cowboy autobiographer. In 1886, he gained employment with Pinkerton's National Detective Agency and worked all over the West as a Pinkerton detective, retiring to his ranch in 1907.

Date
1886
Subjects
Cowboys
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Texas
Photograph of Lucy Parsons

Parsons self-identified as Native American and Chicana. Her family said she was black. Parsons grew up in Texas where she met Albert Richard Parsons in 1869. They married in 1872, although there is not a marriage license on record, and they moved to Chicago in 1873. Lucy Parsons was a prominent figure in Chicago's anarchist and radical labor circles until her death in 1942.

Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Parsons, Lucy
Haymarket monument, Chicago

In 2004 the city of Chicago dedicated a monument to commemorate the anarchist labor leaders arrested in the wake of a bomb explosion in Haymarket Square on May 4, 1886. Behind the monument a giant advertisement for a luxury SUV covers the entire wall of a building.

Creator
Higbie, Tobias
Date
2004
Subjects
Advertising
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Labor
Portrait of Henry Belland, "the Voyageur"

Frank Blackwell Mayer was a Baltimore artist who traveled independently in 1851 to Minnesota to observe and sketch the Sioux Indians present at treaty negotiations at Traverse des Sioux and Mendota. In May of 1851 Mayer left Maryland and journeyed via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Missouri, St. Paul, and Fort Snelling. After visiting Kaposia he accompanied the treaty commissioners to Traverse des Sioux, arriving June 30. Mayer returned to Baltimore by October, having recorded impressions of his travels in a series of sketchbooks and a diary.

Creator
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899
Date
1851
Subjects
Fur trade
Places
Minnesota
People
Mayer, Frank Blackwell, 1827-1899