125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Section of Du Pratz's Map of Louisiana, 1757

The 1757 book A History of Louisiana by Antoine Le Page Du Pratz was among the few books carried with the Lewis & Clark expedition across the North American continent. Du Pratz had lived in present-day Louisiana and Mississippi in the early 1700s and his book described geographic and natural features of the region, including second hand accounts of travels deep into the Great Plains. This section of Du Pratz's map of central North America appeared in a history of Chicago from the 1880s.

Date
1886
Subjects
Mapping
Places
Louisiana
Mississippi River Valley
Capitalism, Humanity, Government

Chicago's anarchist community participated in a national and international debate about the nature of state power in modern society. This cover of Emma Goldman's Mother Earth magazine, drawn by the Dada artist Man Ray, depicts humanity torn apart by capitalism and government, each a different manifestation of the same monstrous reality. Although published in New York City, Mother Earth reported regularly on the activities of Chicago anarchists, and Goldman spent a good deal of time in the city.

Creator
Man Ray
Date
August 1914
People
Goldman, Emma
Prairie Church Parade of General Middleton's Command

This image portrays the Canadian soldiers dispatched to put down the Riel Rebellion as orderly and well-disciplined. It is likely that the illustrator sought to contrast the largely Protestant Canadian troops with the Catholic rebels who were portrayed in other images as unruly drunkards and cowards. In reality the Canadian troops were ill-prepared for combat.

Date
1885
Subjects
Religion
Riel Rebellion, 1885
Demonstrate for Adequate Cash Relief, Chicago, 1936

American workforce was unemployed. Many struggled alone, feeling isolated and disempowered. In Chicago and other large industrial cities, unemployed councils gave voice to the frustrations of the victims of the Depression. Often organized by radicals, the councils demanded increases in relief payments, fought evictions, and illegally turned on gas and electric supplies to poor families cut off by utility companies. The Chicago Commons settlement house worked with the Socialist Party affiliated Illinois Workers Alliance to protest a reduction in relief payments.

Creator
Illinois Workers Alliance
Date
1936
Subjects
Socialism
Working class
Places
Illinois
I Await the Devil's Coming

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films. Never married, she lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Creator
MacLane, Mary
Date
1901
Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Places
Montana
Custer's Last Battle in New Light

In 1927 William Hale Thompson, the mayor of Chicago, had been elected to a third term after vigorously attacking school history textbooks as too pro-British. He sought to commission the writing of a new textbook that would be more “American.” A delegation of Sioux visited Thompson in December 1927 to make the case that a new textbook should correct misleading accounts of American Indian history, including the battle at Little Big Horn.

Creator
Lorenz, Alma
Date
1927
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Education
Indians of North America
Political campaigns
Visions of history
Places
Chicago
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Midway Plaisance looking west, 1893 World's Fair

The Midway Plaisance offered amusements ranging from a replica “Street in Cairo” to carnival rides. The world's first Ferris Wheel, invented by George W. Ferris, was a popular Midway attraction. The 250-foot high steel structure appears in the distance in this picture.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago
Haymarket Monument, Waldheim Cemetery

A monument to four anarchist labor leaders executed in Chicago on November 11, 1887. After a trial that is generally considered a miscarriage of justice, the men were convicted of killing police with a bomb. The words at the base of the statue are those of Albert Parsons, “The day will come when our silence will be more powerful than the voices you are throttling today.” Other important labor and radical leaders, including Emma Goldman, chose to be buried near this monument.

Creator
Weinert, Albert
Subjects
Anarchism
Labor unions
Radicalism
Visions of history
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Is Free Love Possible?

An advertisement for a debate on free love at the Dill Pickle Club.

Date
1930
Subjects
Advertisements
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Gender and society
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Sherwood Anderson, "Jack Jones--The Pickler."

In this article from the Chicago Daily News, the novelist Sherwood Anderson describes the diverse audience at the Dill Pickle Club: “The street car conductor sits on a bench beside the college professor, the literary critic, the earnest young wife, who hungers for culture, and the hobo.”

Creator
Sherwood Anderson
Date
1919
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Literature
Places
Chicago, Illinois