125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Columbia Avenue in Manufactures Building, 1893 World's Fair

A leading photographer of the American West, Jackson made the official set of views for the Exposition.

Creator
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942
Date
1895
Subjects
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Anarchismus

This book was written by the author while in prison awaiting execution for his participation in the Chicago Haymarket Square riot. Albert Parsons was executed on November 11, 1887. Anarchismus is the German translation of Parsons' work, published by his wife Lucy. Only 300 copies of the English version of the book were circulated, the rest being confiscated by police. The German-language version, however, seems to have circulated freely among Chicago's large German speaking population.

Creator
Parsons, Albert R.
Date
1887
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Inside cover to _Great Disclosure of Spiritual Wickedness!!_

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. Abandoned by her husband, Elizabeth moved to Chicago and sold door to door this book recounting her experience. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Creator
Packard, Elizabeth
Date
1865
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
People
Packard, Elizabeth
Letter certifying Christina Olson as Turkish performer at World's Columbian Exposition, 1893

Twelve-year-old Christina Olson performed as a dancer in the Turkish Theater, Midway Plaisance, World's Columbian Exposition, for the summer of 1893. This letter of recommendation, signed by the theater's managers, reads in part, “She has studied the Turkish and Oriental dance and practiced it in the said theater and proved after all to attain a recommendable degree of dance worthy of approval by all the Turks.”

Date
1893
Subjects
Christina Olson
Dance
Theater
World's Columbian Exposition
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The Liberty Belle: She's Cracked

A woman dressed in flapper fashion delivers a speech from a soapbox. She points to a sign reading “Liberate the Libido,” a reference to the growing popularity of the work of Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud who argued, in part, that repressed sexual feelings could manifest themselves in antisocial behavior. A handwritten note at the bottom of the cartoon comments: “A typical scene at the Dill Pickle Club.”

Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Main Gate to Works, Pullman

Workers leave the Pullman Palace Car Works, 1893. This picture appeared in a promotional booklet celebrating the paternalistic labor policies of George Pullman. A year later Pullman's workers were at the center of a national strike of rail workers that failed after federal troops intervened.

Date
1893
Subjects
Industry
Pullman Company
Railroads
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
E.F. Garry to Mr. Lane on Pullman Saving Plan

In the 1920s a growing number of large industrial employers developed welfare, recreation, and representation programs for their employees. This letter, between executives of the Pullman Company, explores the possibility of a company organized savings and investment plan for workers who built, repaired, and serviced railroad cars. Written shortly after the 1922 nationwide strike of railroad shop workers, the letter offers clues as to why employers favored such welfare programs.

Date
1922
Subjects
Industry
Labor
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Report from M. Butler to E.M. Graham, May 11, 1937

The report of an undercover agent to the Pullman Company. Since the late 19th century, the Pullman Company employed African Americans as service workers on its sleeping cars. By the 1920s it was one of the largest industrial employers of African American workers, enjoying a reputation for paternalism. Beginning in the mid-1920s the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) under the leadership of A. Philip Randolph sought to unionize the porters and maids of the Pullman Company. Like other industrial employers, Pullman maintained an extensive network of informants who infiltrated unions and reported back to management.

Date
May 11, 1937
Subjects
African Americans
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Unions
Working class
Places
Pullman (Chicago, Ill.)
Composite of Chicago

A view of Chicago showing ships in the harbor. Surrounding the cityscape are images of prominent buildings. The city's motto “Urbs in Horto” is surrounded by symbolic images.

Date
1857
Subjects
Advertisements
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Speech of John Hossack on the Fugitive Slave Law

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 required the federal government to assist with retrieving runaway slaves even in free states like Illinois. In an act of civil disobedience, businessman John Hossack and seven others helped a runaway slave named Jim Grey escape from federal custody just as he was about to be sent back South. Convicted in a Chicago court, Hossack paid a $100 fine and spent ten days in jail, although he was released each day to dine with Chicago officials and prominent citizens. In his strongly worded defense, Hossack argued, “the parties who prostituted the constitution to the support of slavery, are traitors.”

Creator
Hossack, John
Date
1860
Subjects
Law
Slavery