31 results for “Gender and society”

The Liberty Belle: She's Cracked

A woman dressed in flapper fashion delivers a speech from a soapbox. She points to a sign reading “Liberate the Libido,” a reference to the growing popularity of the work of Austrian psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud who argued, in part, that repressed sexual feelings could manifest themselves in antisocial behavior. A handwritten note at the bottom of the cartoon comments: “A typical scene at the Dill Pickle Club.”

Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Will Amazonic Women Usurp Man's Sphere?

An advertisement for a lecture at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club, printed on the reverse of an advertisement for a lecture by Magnus Hirschfeld. Little is known about the speaker, Elizabeth Davis, who appears to have been part of the bohemian community on Chicago's north side.

Creator
Dill Pickle Club
Date
1931
Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
homosexuality
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Dill Pickle Club House and Chapel

A handbill advertises three plays at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club. An inset map shows artists' studios nearby. The plays touched on social and political issues including labor conflict, abortion, drug use, and Irish nationalism.

Date
1927
Subjects
Advertisements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Strikes
Theater
Places
Chicago, Illinois
Sexual Reform on a Scientific Basis

Cover of the literary magazine Earth published in Wheaton, Illinois. Magnus Hirschfeld, an openly gay German physician, was a long-time advocate of human rights for sexual minorities. The article appeared around the time Hirschfeld was lecturing in Chicago.

Creator
Hirschfield, Magnus
Date
1931
Subjects
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Homosexuality
Places
Chicago, Illinois
The Season in Full Swing at the Dill Pickles

An advertisement for a week of events at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club suggests the eclectic mix of radicalism and ribaldry typical of the club. During the fall of 1930 Mae West's melodrama “Sex” played at Chicago's Garrick Theater promising audiences “55 people” on stage and “555 Thrills.” Earlier in the year, West became an unlikely icon of free speech when she prevailed over New York City prosecutors who accused her of producing obscene plays. Hypolite Havel was an anarchist intellectual and former associate of Emma Goldman. Ralph Chaplin was an editor and illustrator for the Industrial Workers of the World and the author of the labor anthem “Solidarity Forever.”

Date
1930
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Towards the Dawn!

A family walks an uphill road toward a rising sun symbolizing the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  The Great Depression of the 1930s hit farmers and rural communities particularly hard.  Across the Great Plains rural people supported a variety of political movements that sought greater involvement of national governments in the management of the economy.  In 1932 several Canadian farmer, labor, and socialist groups came together to form a political party known as the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF).  Influenced by socialist and agrarian reform movements in Europe and North America, he goal of the CCF was an economic system “in which the principle regulating production, distribution and exchange will be the supplying of human needs and not the making of profits,” according an early manifesto.  The CCF moderated some of its more radical positions, but remained a self-described “socialist” party when it won a majority of the seats in the Saskatchewan provincial assembly in 1944.  The CCF maintained its political leadership in province for 20 years enacting important social legislation effecting health care, education, and rural electrification. In the 1960s, the CCF merged with other groups to become the New Democratic Party.

Creator
Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation
Date
ca. 1930s
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Socialism
Working class
Places
Saskatchewan
Is Free Love Possible?

An advertisement for a debate on free love at the Dill Pickle Club.

Date
1930
Subjects
Advertisements
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Education
Gender and society
Places
Chicago, Illinois
I Await the Devil's Coming

Nineteen-year-old Mary MacLane from Butte, Montana, may have been the original flapper. She wrote “I Await the Devil's Coming” and sent it to Chicago's Stone and Kimball Company. When it appeared in print in 1902, re-titled The Story of Mary MacLane, the book sparked controversy with its references to the author's sexual longings. Literary critics proclaimed it a work of refreshing openness, while more traditional readers thought it improper for a young woman. For a time, her name became synonymous with female sexuality. MacLane went on to write several other books and to act in early films. Never married, she lived in Chicago until her death in 1929.

Creator
MacLane, Mary
Date
1901
Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Places
Montana
Theodore Roosevelt to Edith Wyatt

Despite mixed feelings, Theodore Roosevelt officially supported women's suffrage in his 1912 presidential campaign. His discomfort with the subject is evident in a letter he wrote in reply to Chicago literary critic Edith Franklin Wyatt. Roosevelt suggests that women's suffrage might help in the fight against prostitution. He also expresses doubts about the positive effects of women's votes, however, noting that there has been little change in states that have granted them suffrage.

Creator
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Date
December 15, 1912
Subjects
Gender and society
Suffrage
People
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Capitalism, Humanity, Government

Chicago's anarchist community participated in a national and international debate about the nature of state power in modern society. This cover of Emma Goldman's Mother Earth magazine, drawn by the Dada artist Man Ray, depicts humanity torn apart by capitalism and government, each a different manifestation of the same monstrous reality. Although published in New York City, Mother Earth reported regularly on the activities of Chicago anarchists, and Goldman spent a good deal of time in the city.

Creator
Man Ray
Date
August 1914
People
Goldman, Emma