31 results for “Gender and society”

Heroism of a Pioneer Woman

A tableau of frontier violence. This image accompanied the tale of a 1791 attack on the John Merrill home in Kentucky in which Mrs. Merrill killed five attackers with her ax. Along with stories of white settlers taken captive by American Indians, images like this portrayed settlers as victims of Indian aggression and celebrated the strength of settler women as a sign of the strength of the young American nation.

Date
1860
Subjects
Frontier and pioneer life
Gender and society
Indians of North America
Violence
Places
Mississippi River Valley
West (U.S.)
Photograph of Elizabeth Packard

As a result of disagreements over religion and money, Theophilus Packard committed his wife of twenty-one years, Elizabeth Ware Packard, to the Illinois insane asylum in 1860. Three years later, Elizabeth's son secured her release. Immediately upon her return to their Kankakee home, Theophilus locked her inside and prepared to move her out of the state. Through the help of friends, Elizabeth proved her sanity in court. She convinced Illinois to change its commitment process and spent the rest of her life advocating for greater protections for wives from tyrannical husbands.

Date
1866
Subjects
Gender and society
Places
Illinois
People
Packard, Elizabeth
There Ought to Be School for the Instruction of Women Voters

This cartoon appeared in the Chicago Tribune five days after the Illinois House of Representatives approved women's suffrage in Illinois.

Creator
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949
Date
1913
Subjects
Education
Gender and society
Suffrage
Places
Illinois
Rights of Married Women

Myra Colby Bradwell began publishing the Chicago Legal News in 1868, to agitate for a wide range of women's rights. In this editorial, Bradwell argued for the broadest possible interpretation of an 1869 Illinois law granting married women the right to control their own incomes. As a married woman, Bradwell confronted several legal problems. She had to obtain a special state charter in order to control the publication of her own newspaper. Also, she was qualified to become an attorney, but she was denied admission to the bar because she was married. She appealed this decision to the United States Supreme Court, but lost. Twenty years later, Illinois changed its law and, acting on her original petition of 1869, admitted Bradwell to the bar.

Creator
Bradwell, Myra
Date
1869
Subjects
Civil rights
Gender and society
Law
People
Bradwell, Myra
Help Lift the Lid

An advertisement for an evening at Chicago's Dill Pickle Club.

Date
[1920 or 1926]
Subjects
Advertising
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Entertainment
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
A Night in Bohemia: Dill Pickle Masked Ball

Among the most popular Dill Pickle Club events were its frequent masquerade balls. These events appealed to a broad range of partygoers, allowing wealthy residents of the Gold Coast to mingle in relative anonymity with working people and artists. Masquerade balls also attracted gay men and women. Under cover of the party, women could dress as men and men as women. With so many people cross-dressing, few took notice of same sex couples. Although the Dill Pickle Club closed early in the 1930s, citywide Halloween Balls continued to be meeting places for gay men and women into the 1940s.

Date
1916
Subjects
Amusements
Dill Pickle Club
Gender and society
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
Pitch In and Help!: Join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps

At harvest time during World War II domestic labor shortages became particularly difficult. U.S. government posters recruited women to join the Women's Land Army of the U.S. Crop Corps to ensure that crops were harvested in time.

Creator
Morley, Hubert
Date
1944
Subjects
Agriculture
Gender and society
World War II
The Garment Workers' Strike

In 1910 and 1915, tens of thousands of Chicago garment workers, many of them young immigrant women, took to the streets to protest their working conditions. Many of the female leaders of the strike were affiliated with the Women's Trade Union League (WTUL), a national organization that sought better conditions for working women through unionization and education.

Date
1915
Subjects
Gender and society
Strikes and lockouts
Working class
Places
Chicago (Ill.)
The Codfish and the Cattle Princess

The caption reads: “He didn't know any girls at home who dressed like men and could talk to a fellow in this frank and unconscious fashion.”

Creator
Ryerson, Florence
Date
1918
Subjects
Cowboys
Gender and society
Ranch life
Places
West (U.S.)
Capitalism, Humanity, Government

Chicago's anarchist community participated in a national and international debate about the nature of state power in modern society. This cover of Emma Goldman's Mother Earth magazine, drawn by the Dada artist Man Ray, depicts humanity torn apart by capitalism and government, each a different manifestation of the same monstrous reality. Although published in New York City, Mother Earth reported regularly on the activities of Chicago anarchists, and Goldman spent a good deal of time in the city.

Creator
Man Ray
Date
August 1914
People
Goldman, Emma