125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Homesteads and Pre-Emptions

During the late 19th century the U.S. government aided settlement of farm farmers on the Great Plains by offering land at very low prices to those who would establish farms. As this description of the process indicates, immigrants seeking homestead land were required to declared their intention to become American citizen. For European immigrants this was a very small barrier.

Date
1872
Subjects
Agriculture
Immigration
Railroads
Places
Great Plains
Kansas
Nebraska
Custer's Last Rally

In the preface to the book, the author, T. M. Newson, claims, “Most scenes described, and nearly all the incidents narrated, in the pages of this book, were part of my own personal experience of a residence of some thirty years on the frontier, and for which I can vouch as true, except, perhaps, the incidents of the last great battle of the lamented Custer with Sitting Bull, and for these I am indebted to one who was early on the ground after the conflict, and who has obtained from the Indians themselves what I deem to be a very accurate picture of the terrible struggle between contending forces.”

Date
1884
Subjects
Battle of the Little Bighorn
Indians of North America
Places
Little Bighorn Battlefield (Mont.)
People
Custer, George Armstrong, 1839-1876
Sitting Bull, 1834?-1890
Photograph of Margery Currey Dell

Margery Currey Dell and her husband Floyd Dell were part of a social network of writers, journalists and artists who comprised the literary movement known as the Chicago Renaissance.

Subjects
Gender and society
Literature
Suffrage
People
Currey, Margery
Earth flags and Golden Arches

Police cordon surround an antiwar march, March 2004, Chicago. The Earth flags carried by protesters and the corporate advertising in the background are contrasting symbols of globalization.

Creator
Koslow, Jennifer
Date
2004
Subjects
Police
Political campaigns
Protests
Representation of Life in a Cow Camp

The book from which this image is taken established Siringo's fame as the first cowboy autobiographer. In 1886, he gained employment with Pinkerton's National Detective Agency and worked all over the West as a Pinkerton detective, retiring to his ranch in 1907.

Date
1886
Subjects
Cowboys
Frontier and pioneer life
Places
Texas
Sharecropper, cover of _New Anvil,_ May-June 1940

Jack Conroy, a worker and proletarian writer born in a coal mining camp in Missouri, moved to Chicago in 1938, where he worked on the Illinois Writers Project and edited the New Anvil, a small literary magazine, with Nelson Algren.

Creator
de Graff, Stanley
Date
1940
Subjects
Literature
Working class
People
Conroy, Jack
Agriculture section, Aurora Beacon-News Centennial Edition

In 1937 the Aurora Beacon-News commemorated the centennial of Aurora, Illinois, 40 miles west of Chicago. The cover of the agricultural section represented Aurora as a trading center at the heart of an agricultural region dotted by tributary communities strung out along rail and water transportation routes.

Date
September 1937
Subjects
Advertising
Agriculture
Attention Workingmen! Achtung Arbeiter!

This bilingual broadside advertised a meeting in Chicago's Haymarket Square in 1886. An explosion near the end of the rally resulted in at least eleven deaths and dozens of injuries. Though the person responsible for the bombing was never known, eight anarchists were arrested and put on trial. The purpose of the meeting was to protest a conflict at the McCormick Reaper Works a day earlier in which police shot and killed six workers.

Date
1886
Subjects
Anarchism
Haymarket Square Riot, 1886
Immigration
Working class
Theodore Roosevelt to Edith Wyatt

Despite mixed feelings, Theodore Roosevelt officially supported women's suffrage in his 1912 presidential campaign. His discomfort with the subject is evident in a letter he wrote in reply to Chicago literary critic Edith Franklin Wyatt. Roosevelt suggests that women's suffrage might help in the fight against prostitution. He also expresses doubts about the positive effects of women's votes, however, noting that there has been little change in states that have granted them suffrage.

Creator
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Date
December 15, 1912
Subjects
Gender and society
Suffrage
People
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
Woman's Protest Against Woman Suffrage

Chicago novelist Caroline F. Corbin considered socialism and women's suffrage closely allied evils. Together, she believed, the two would undermine the traditional family and ultimately harm women. In 1897, Corbin formed the Illinois Association Opposed to the Extension of Suffrage to Women (IAOESW). In this tract, IAOESW argues that imposing the obligations of suffrage upon women will undermine their ability to fulfill their civic responsibilities as mothers and wives. Instead, it argues that women are fully represented by the votes of their husbands, brothers, and sons.

Creator
Illinois Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage
Date
1909
Subjects
Gender and society
Political campaigns
Suffrage