125 results for “Chicago (Ill.)”

Farmer planting corn near Creston, Iowa

Although many had switched to motorized tractors by the late 1940s, this farmer in southwestern Iowa was still using horses.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Farming
Places
Iowa
Milking time at the Rader farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Leroy Rader milks a cow on his family farm near Knoxville, Illinois, 1948. Even in the 20th century, children's work was an important part of successful farming.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Corn planting near Friend, [Nebraska]

Two farmers planting with a tractor in eastern Nebraska. Photographer Esther Bubley and her colleague Russell Lee documented daily life along the route of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad in 1948 in preparation for the book Granger Country.

Creator
Bubley, Esther
Date
1948
Subjects
Agriculture
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Places
Nebraska
Children walking on railroad tracks near Knoxville, Illinois

In 1948 the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad hired two photographers to document work at the company and life in the communities it served. A series of pictures featured life on the Rader family farm near Knoxville, Illinois. Images like this one of the Rader children on their way to school were intended to show the wholesome relationship between families, communities, and the railroad corporation.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Children
Railroads
Places
Illinois
Sleeping on the Burlington Route and Eating on the Burlington Route

Printed in a guidebook, “How to Go West,” these advertisements for Pullman cars stressed elegance, comfort, and speed. Pullman cars changed the nature of rail travel for middle and upper class travelers.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism
Farm woman gathering eggs

Although tending poultry was considered “women's work” on midwestern farms, it was a profitable enterprise that brought in much needed cash for farm families.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Agriculture
Farming
Gender and society
Places
Illinois
Bridge building in Illinois

With the help of a steam-powered crane, workers place a massive steel beam into a railroad bridge. Steel and concrete bridges allowed for heavier trains and were more durable than the wood and stone bridges they replaced.

Creator
United States Army Corps of Engineers
Date
ca. 1890
Subjects
Bridges
Railroads
Workers
Places
Illinois
View of Burlington

A view from the south of the town of Burlington, Iowa. Paddle wheel boats navigate the Mississippi River while others dock at the shore. In the foreground a locomotive crosses the iron bridge spanning the river. Steeples of the town's many churches are visible along the skyline. Printed in the guidebook “How to Go West,” the image suggests opportunities for work, trade, and community for those moving west.

Date
1872
Subjects
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Railroads
Places
Iowa
Mississippi River
Boy separating cream at the Rader Farm, Knoxville, Illinois

Children of farm families were expected to help out with farm work from a young age. Here one of the sons of the farmer Scott Rader uses a machine to separate cream from raw milk. Behind him sits a Maytag clothes washing machine. As more farm homes gained access to electricity over the mid-twentieth century, domestic machinery transformed the work of maintaining a farm household.

Creator
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Date
ca. 1949
Subjects
Children
Dairy farmers
Farming
Places
Illinois
Items for Passengers Going Across the Continent

A page from the guidebook “How to Go West” details the prices for passengers and freight traveling across North America in the early 1870s. Sleeping cars were reserved for 1st class passengers only. Second class and emigrant class passengers rode in less elegant accommodations and were advised to bring “a lunch basket” for a trip lasting several days from Omaha to San Francisco.

Date
1872
Subjects
Advertisement
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company
Pullman cars
Railroads
Tourism