Working on the Railroad

Railways have stitched together central North America since the 1850s. They were the largest organizations of the time, managing complex flows of commodities, people, and information. Farmers, workers, and manufacturers relied on railroads, and many communities were literally created by railroad companies to serve the industry. Not surprisingly, railroad companies became the object of great protest as well as a subject of fascination and romance.

Railroad building on the Great Plains View of Burlington Sleeping on the Burlington Route and Eating on the Burlington Route Main Gate to Works, Pullman King Debs Labor rally poster, Du Sable High School Railroad employee reading strike news, Burlington, Iowa Cleaning the Vista Dome Car

Railroad building on the Great Plains

Waud, Alfred R. (Alfred Rudolph), 1828-1891

Harper's Weekly 19 (July 17, 1875): 577.

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View of Burlington

In How To Go West: A Guide to Southern Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, California and the Whole Great West. Chicago: Horton & Leonard, Railroad Printer, 1872, 20.

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Sleeping on the Burlington Route and Eating on the Burlington Route

In How To Go West: A Guide to Southern Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, California and the Whole Great West. Chicago: Horton & Leonard, Railroad Printer, 1872, 60-61.

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Main Gate to Works, Pullman

In The Story of Pullman, 1893.

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King Debs

Rogers, W. A.

In Harper's Weekly, July 14, 1894.

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Labor rally poster, Du Sable High School

Pullman Company Archives, Labor Union Negotiation and Agreement Files, 06/01/04, Box 17, Folder 491, Newberry Library.

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Railroad employee reading strike news, Burlington, Iowa

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company Collection, Newberry Library.

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Cleaning the Vista Dome Car

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company

CB&Q Miscellaneous. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company Collection, Newberry Library.

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