Oklahoma: Consolidated Chronology of State and County Boundaries

Oklahoma Atlas of Historical County Boundaries

John H. Long, Editor; Peggy Tuck Sinko, Associate Editor; Robert Will, Historical Compiler; Douglas Knox, Book Digitizing Director; Emily Kelley, Digital Compiler; Laura Rico-Beck, GIS Specialist; Peter Siczewicz, ArcIMS Interactive Map Designer

Copyright The Newberry Library 2008


30 April 1803

The United States purchased Louisiana from France, taking formal possession on 20 December 1803; the boundaries were not clearly defined, but included the western half of the Mississippi drainage basin (from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains). It included all of present Oklahoma. (Parry, 57:27-40; Van Zandt, 23-26)

1 October 1804

The United States divided the Louisiana Purchase at the parallel of 33 degrees north latitude into the District of Louisiana and Orleans Territory. All of present Oklahoma became part of the District of Louisiana; the District was not fully organized and was attached to Indiana Territory for administrative and judicial purposes. NEW MADRID District (now NEW MADRID, Mo.) was created by the District of Louisiana from non-county area; it included all or part of seven present states, including all of present Oklahoma. (Terr. Papers U.S., 13: 51-52; U.S. Stat., vol. 2, ch. 38 [1804]/pp. 283-289)

4 July 1805

NEW MADRID District (now NEW MADRID, Mo.) became a district (county) in Louisiana Territory when the District of Louisiana was renamed Louisiana Territory. (U.S. Stat., vol. 2, ch. 31[1805]/pp. 331-332)

1 July 1806

NEW MADRID District (now NEW MADRID, Mo.) gained from CAPE GIRARDEAU District (now CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo.); area within present Oklahoma was unchanged. (Terr. Papers U.S., 13:541-542)

15 August 1806

CAPE GIRARDEAU District (now CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo.) gained from NEW MADRID District (now NEW MADRID, Mo.); CAPE GIRARDEAU included a small portion of present Oklahoma. (Ford, 5-6)

7 December 1812

Louisiana Territory was renamed Missouri Territory. CAPE GIRARDEAU (Mo.) and NEW MADRID (Mo.) boundaries were redefined; both counties were eliminated from present Oklahoma. All of present Oklahoma became non-county area in Missouri Territory. (Royce, 676-677, pls. 112, 144; Terr. Papers U.S., 14:599-601)

22 February 1819

The boundary of Missouri Territory was altered when the Adams-Onis Treaty between the United States and Spain established the southern and western boundaries of the United States territory south of the parallel of 42 degrees north latitude. The United States gained clear title to the eastern portion of present Oklahoma, which remained in Missouri Territory; Spain, which ruled Mexico, gained title to the panhandle. (Parry, 70:1-30; Van Zandt, 120-121)

1 June 1819

CLARK (Ark.), HEMPSTEAD (Ark.), and PULASKI (Ark.) created by Missouri Territory from ARKANSAS (Ark.) and non-county area in Missouri Territory. CLARK and PULASKI included territory in present Arkansas and Oklahoma; HEMPSTEAD included territory in present Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. The precise location of the boundary between Mexico and the United States from the Red River south to 33 degrees north latitude was uncertain, resulting in competing claims to an area of present Texas. Act passed 15 December 1818; took effect 1 June 1819. (Mo. Terr. Laws 1818-1819, ch. 232a, secs. 1-5/pp. 589-591)

4 July 1819

The United States created Arkansas Territory from Missouri Territory; Arkansas Territory included all of present Arkansas and part of present Oklahoma. CLARK (Ark.), HEMPSTEAD (Ark.), and PULASKI (Ark.) became counties in Arkansas Territory. The northern part of present Oklahoma remained non-county area in Missouri Territory. (U.S. Stat., vol. 3, ch. 49[1819]/pp. 493-496; Van Zandt, 118-119)

1 April 1820

MILLER (Ark., original, extinct) created by Arkansas Territory from HEMPSTEAD (Ark.); MILLER included parts of present Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. HEMPSTEAD (Ark.) eliminated from present Oklahoma. (Ark. Terr. Acts 1820, 1st sess., pp. 83-86; Reynolds, 230-231)

18 October 1820

Treaty of Doak's Stand, between the United States and the Choctaw Indians, granted possession of the territory north of Red River and west of a point three miles below the mouth of Little River in present Arkansas to the Choctaws; included all of MILLER (Ark., original, extinct) north of Red River. White settlers protested, but the War Department did attempt to remove settlers living west of the Kiamichi River in present Oklahoma. (Royce, 700-703; Strickland, 162-165)

1 January 1821

CRAWFORD (Ark.) created by Arkansas Territory from PULASKI (Ark.) and non-county area in Arkansas Territory; PULASKI (Ark.) eliminated from present Oklahoma. CRAWFORD (Ark.) included territory in present Arkansas and Oklahoma. Act passed 18 October 1820; took effect 1 January 1821. (Ark. Terr. Acts 1820, 1st sess., pp. 123-125)

10 August 1821

The state of Missouri was created from Missouri Territory. Missouri Territory was eliminated, and all that part of the former Territory north and west of the state of Missouri, including the northern portion of present Oklahoma, became unorganized federal territory. (Terr. Papers U.S., 15: 742-744; U.S. Stat., vol. 3, ch. 22[1820]/pp. 545-548 and res. 1[1821]/p. 645; Van Zandt, 117)

24 August 1821

Mexico gained its independence from Spain; the panhandle of present Oklahoma came under the control of the Republic of Mexico. ("Mexican War of Independence," New Handbook of Texas, 4:698)

24 October 1821

CRAWFORD (Ark.) exchanged with PULASKI (Ark.); area within present Oklahoma was unchanged. (Ark. Terr. Acts 1821, 2d sess., pp. 20-21)

30 October 1823

CRAWFORD (Ark.) gained non-county area in Arkansas Territory. CLARK (Ark.) gained from CRAWFORD (Ark.) and PULASKI (Ark.). (Ark. Terr. Acts 1823, 3d sess., pp. 50-52)

26 May 1824

Arkansas Territory was reduced in size when the western extent of the territory was moved to a line running forty miles west of the southwest corner of Missouri. CLARK (Ark.), CRAWFORD (Ark.), and MILLER (Ark., original, extinct) lost to Choctaw Indian territory in present Oklahoma. Unorganized federal territory in present Oklahoma became known as Indian Territory as Indian tribes were removed from organized states and territories and resettled in present Oklahoma. (U.S. Stat., vol. 4, ch. 155 [1824]/pp. 40-41; Gittinger, 13-17; Morris, Goins, McReynolds, 21; Van Zandt, 119)

20 January 1825

Treaty of Washington between the United States and Choctaw Indians definitively established the eastern line of the Choctaw Session (present boundary between Arkansas and Oklahoma) and affirmed Choctaw control of the area west of the line, including part of CLARK (Ark.), CRAWFORD (Ark.), and MILLER (Ark., original, extinct). Arkansas citizens protested, and the treaty provisions were not fully implemented until 1828. (Royce, 708-709; Morris, Goins, McReynolds, 21; Strickland, 162-163, 170)

13 October 1827

CLARK (Ark.) lost to PULASKI (Ark.); area within present Oklahoma was unchanged. (Ark. Terr. Acts 1827, 5th sess., p. 5)

CRAWFORD (Ark.) lost to IZARD (Ark.); area within present Oklahoma was unchanged. (Ark. Terr. Acts 1827, 5th sess., pp. 4-5)

1 December 1827

LOVELEY (Ark. Terr., extinct) created by Arkansas Territory from CRAWFORD (Ark.) and non-county area in Arkansas Territory. LOVELEY included territory in present Arkansas and Oklahoma. Act passed 13 October 1827; took effect 1 December 1827. (Ark. Terr. Acts 1827, 5th sess., pp. 6-8; Gabler, 31-39)

6 May 1828

Indian Territory gained from Arkansas Territory when the Treaty of Washington between the United States and Choctaw Indians definitively established the eastern line of the Choctaw Session (present boundary between Arkansas and Oklahoma) and affirmed Choctaw control of the area west of the line. CLARK (Ark.), CRAWFORD (Ark.), LOVELEY (Ark. Terr., extinct), and MILLER (Ark., original, extinct) eliminated from present Oklahoma. (U.S. Stat., vol. 7, p. 311; Gabler, 37-39; Royce, 720-721; Van Zandt, 119)

20 October 1828

MILLER (Ark., original, extinct) county seat was relocated to Jonesborough on the south bank of Red River, effectively ending efforts by Arkansas Territory to retain control of Indian lands north of Red River in present Oklahoma. (Ark. Terr. Acts 1828, spec. sess., pp. 9-10)

2 March 1836

Texas declared its independence from Mexico. The Republic of Texas claimed the panhandle of present Oklahoma, and another part of Oklahoma between the Red River and the North Fork of the Red River [see 19 December 1836]. ("Republic of Texas," New Handbook of Texas, 5:537-538; Swindler, 9:247, 249)

19 December 1836

The Republic of Texas established its boundaries following its declaration of independence from Mexico on 2 March 1836, ending Mexican claims to present Oklahoma. BEXAR (Tex.) boundaries implicitly expanded to cover all non-county area in the Republic of Texas including the panhandle of present Oklahoma. BEXAR also overlapped part of southwest Oklahoma (then Indian Territory), which Texas claimed based on its contention that the North Fork of the Red River was the main channel of that river. Two changes in BEXAR boundaries between 19 December 1836 and 27 November 1839 did not affect present Oklahoma and are not mapped here. (Texas Repub. Laws 1836, 1st cong./p. 133; Frantz and Cox, 29, 31; Stephens and Holmes, 34)

28 November 1839

FANNIN (Tex.) gained from BEXAR (Tex.), NACOGDOCHES (Tex.), and ROBERTSON (Tex.); FANNIN included the area bounded by the North Fork of the Red River, which overlapped Indian Territory in present Oklahoma. (Texas Repub. Laws 1839, 4th cong./p. 194)

29 December 1845

The United States Congress admitted Texas to the Union; Republic of Texas eliminated. Texas continued to claim part of present southwestern Oklahoma between the Main Fork and the North Fork of the Red River. (Texas Repub. Laws 1845, 9th cong., spec. sess./pp. 4-6; U.S. Stat., vol. 9, res. 1 [1845]/p. 108; Van Zandt, 122)

14 March 1846

Part of FANNIN (Tex.) reverted to non-county area in Texas; FANNIN eliminated from the area between the North Fork and the Main Fork of the Red River, which overlapped Indian Territory. Between 14 March 1846 and 7 February 1860 this area was at times part of Fannin Land District (Tex.), Cooke Land District (Tex.), and Young Territory (Tex.). (Texas Laws 1846, 1st leg./p. 6)

15 March 1848

SANTA FE (Tex., extinct) created by Texas from BEXAR (Tex.); SANTA FE included parts of present Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. BEXAR (Tex.) eliminated from present Oklahoma. (Texas Laws 1847, 2d leg., ch. 87/p. 95)

31 December 1849

SANTA FE (Tex., extinct) boundaries were redefined; area within present Oklahoma was unchanged. (Texas Laws 1849, 3d leg., reg. sess., ch. 24/p. 21)

13 December 1850

The panhandle of present Oklahoma became unorganized federal territory when the state of Texas sold land in present Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, and Wyoming to the United States, eliminating SANTA FE (Tex.). Area was also known as "No Man's Land" and the "Public Land Strip." (U.S. Stat., vol. 9, ch. 49 [1850]/pp. 446-452 and appendix, sec. 10/pp. 1005-1006; Texas Laws 1850, 3d leg., 3d sess., ch. 2/p. 4; Van Zandt, 122)

8 February 1860

GREER created by Texas from Young Territory (Tex.) ; not fully organized. GREER was located entirely in present Oklahoma, but Texas claimed the area based on its contention that the North Fork of Red River was the main channel of that river. GREER overlapped portions of Indian Territory and, after 2 May 1890, part of Oklahoma Territory. (Texas Laws 1859, 8th leg., reg. sess., gen., ch. 90/p. 138)

14 February 1860

GREER attached to MONTAGUE (Tex.) "for all judicial purposes." (Texas Laws 1859, 8th leg., reg. sess., gen., ch. 87, sec. 6/p. 120)

11 October 1866

GREER detached from MONTAGUE (Tex.), attached to YOUNG (Tex.) "for judicial purposes." (Texas Laws 1866, 11th leg., ch. 35, sec. 17/p. 27)

6 November 1866

GREER detached from YOUNG (Tex.), attached to MONTAGUE (Tex.) "for judicial and other purposes." (Texas Laws 1866, 11th leg., ch. 96, sec. 2/p. 94)

7 October 1879

GREER detached from MONTAGUE (Tex.), attached to WHEELER (Tex.) "for judicial purposes." (Texas Laws 1879, 16th leg., spec. sess., ch. 30, sec. 3/p. 29)

July 1886

GREER fully organized in the state of Texas and detached from WHEELER (Tex.). ("Greer County," New Handbook of Texas, 3:326)

1 March 1889

The U.S. Congress established a United States Court in the Indian Territory. (U.S. Stat., vol. 25, ch. 333[1889]/p. 783; Morris, Goins and McReynolds, map 45; Van Zandt, 141)

2 May 1890

The United States created Oklahoma Territory from Indian Territory and unorganized federal territory (the Oklahoma panhandle or Public Land Strip). The Territorial Governor created counties numbered 1 to 7 by proclamation. ("Proclamation," Weekly Oklahoma State Capital [newspaper], 7 June 1890; U.S. Stat., vol. 26, ch. 182[1890], sec. 4/p. 83; Morris, 116118; Van Zandt, 139-140):

1 September 1891

The U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Interior created counties A to I from non-county area in Oklahoma Territory and altered other county boundaries by proclamation. ("Will Open," Weekly Oklahoma State Capital [newspaper], 25 July 1891; Morris, 119-120; Morris, Goins, and McReynolds, map 54):

19 August 1893

Oklahoma Territory gained a portion of the Indian Territory, designated the Cherokee Outlet, under a treaty between the United States and the Cherokee Nation, dated 19 December 1891, ratified by Congress on 3 March 1893, and proclaimed by President Grover Cleveland on 19 August 1893. (U.S. Stat., vol. 27, ch. 209[1893]/pp. 640-641 and vol. 28, procl. 5/pp. 1225-1227; Morris, 120-123; Morris, Goins, and McReynolds, map 54; Van Zandt, 140)

16 September 1893

Counties K to Q were created in Oklahoma Territory from the Cherokee Outlet and non-county area in Oklahoma Territory, and PAYNE boundaries were enlarged. (U.S. Stat., vol. 27, ch. 209[1893]/pp. 640-641 and vol. 28, procl. 5/pp. 1225-1227; Gittinger, 200; Morris, 120-123; Morris, Goins, and McReynolds, map 54; Van Zandt, 140):

16 March 1896

GREER eliminated from Texas when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that GREER was not within the boundaries of Texas, but was under the jurisdiction of the United States. ("United States v. Texas," in U.S. Rpts., 162:1-91; U.S. Stat., vol. 29, ch. 155[1896]/pp. 113-114)

4 May 1896

GREER became a county in Oklahoma Territory following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling of 16 March 1896 that determined GREER was not within the boundaries of the state of Texas, but was under the jurisdiction of the United States. (U.S. Stat., vol. 29, ch. 155 [1896]/p. 113; Van Zandt, 122, 140; Morris, 123-124)

8 July 1901

CADDO created by proclamation of the U. S. Assistant Secretary of the Interior from part of COUNTY I (Okla. Terr., extinct) and non-county area in Oklahoma Territory; COUNTY I eliminated. ("President's Proclamation, The Boundary Lines," The Daily Oklahoman [newspaper], 9 July 1901; Morris, 124)

COMANCHE and KIOWA created from non-county area in Oklahoma Territory by proclamation of the U. S. Assistant Secretary of the Interior. ("President's Proclamation, The Boundary Lines," The Daily Oklahoman [newspaper], 9 July 1901; Morris, 124)

BLAINE, CANADIAN, and CUSTER gained part of COUNTY I (Okla. Terr., extinct; the Wichita Indian Reservation); COUNTY I eliminated. ("President's Proclamation, The Boundary Lines," The Daily Oklahoman [newspaper], 9 July 1901; Morris, 124)

ROGER MILLS gained a small non-county area in Oklahoma Territory (part of the Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Indian Reservation). ("President's Proclamation, The Boundary Lines," The Daily Oklahoman [newspaper], 9 July 1901; Morris, 124)

WASHITA gained part of COUNTY I (the Wichita Indian Reservation), and gained from non-county area in Oklahoma Territory (part of the Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Indian Reservation). ("President's Proclamation, The Boundary Lines," The Daily Oklahoman [newspaper], 9 July 1901; Morris, 124)

21 April 1904

KAY gained from non-county area in Oklahoma Territory (Kaw Indian Reservation and part of the Ponca Indian Reservation). (U.S. Stat., vol. 33, ch. 1402[1904], sec. 8/p. 218; Bureau of the Census, 1910, p. 424)

NOBLE gained from non-county area in Oklahoma Territory (parts of the Otoe and Missouri, and the Ponca Indian Reservations). (U.S. Stat., vol. 33, ch. 1402[1904], sec. 8/p. 218; Bureau of the Census, 1910, p. 424)

PAWNEE gained from non-county area in Oklahoma Territory (part of the Otoe and Missouri Indian Reservation). (U.S. Stat., vol. 33, ch. 1402[1904], sec. 8/p. 218; Bureau of the Census, 1910, p. 424)

14 March 1905

The state of Arkansas (SEBASTIAN Co.) gained approximately 130 acres from Indian Territory along the Poteau River when the U.S. Congress changed the western boundary of Arkansas. Congressional act was approved 10 February 1905 [too small to map]. (Ark. Acts 1905, 35th sess., nos. 41, 87/pp. 124-125, 212-213; Morris, Goins, and McReynolds, 61; U.S. Stat., vol. 33, ch. 571[1905]/pp. 714-715; Van Zandt, 120)

7 November 1905

Citizens of Indian Territory attempted to establish a separate state of Sequoyah. A constitutional convention met in August 1905, and voters approved it on 7 November 1905. Bills to admit the state of Sequoyah were introduced in the U.S. Congress, but were tabled. (Morris, Goins and McReynolds, map 56; Maxwell, 161-192, 299-340; Gittinger, 250-253; Swindler, 8:35-75)

16 November 1907

The United States created the state of Oklahoma from Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory; Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory eliminated. The state of Oklahoma immediately created 50 new counties and altered the boundaries of 11 existing counties. (U.S. Stat., vol. 34, ch. 3335 [1906]/pp. 267-268 and vol. 35, pp. 2160-2161; Van Zandt, 140-141)

ADAIR, ATOKA, BRYAN, CARTER, CHEROKEE, CHOCTAW, COAL, CRAIG, CREEK, DELAWARE, GARVIN, HASKELL, HUGHES, JOHNSTON, LATIMER, LE FLORE, LOVE, McCLAIN, McCURTAIN, McINTOSH, MARSHALL, MAYES, MURRAY, MUSKOGEE, NOWATA, OKFUSKEE, OKMULGEE, OTTAWA, PITTSBURG, PONTOTOC, PUSHMATAHA, ROGERS, SEMINOLE, SEQUOYAH, TULSA, WAGONER, and WASHINGTON created from former Indian Territory. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:141-156)

ALFALFA and MAJOR created from WOODS. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:141, 149)

BECKHAM created from GREER and ROGER MILLS. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:142)

CIMARRON and TEXAS created from BEAVER. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:143, 154)

ELLIS created from part of DAY (Okla. Terr., extinct) and WOODWARD; DAY eliminated. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:145)

GRADY created from CADDO, COMANCHE, and former Indian Territory. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:145)

HARPER created from WOODWARD. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:146)

JACKSON created from GREER. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:147)

JEFFERSON and STEPHENS created from COMANCHE and former Indian Territory. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:147, 154)

OSAGE created from non-county area in the former Oklahoma Territory (Osage Indian Reservation). (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:152)

TILLMAN created from COMANCHE. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:154)

BEAVER lost to creation of CIMARRON and TEXAS. BEAVER became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:141-142)

BLAINE lost small area to CADDO; BLAINE became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:142)

CADDO gained small area from BLAINE, lost to creation of GRADY; CADDO became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:142)

COMANCHE lost to creation of GRADY, JEFFERSON, STEPHENS, and TILLMAN. COMANCHE became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:144)

DAY (Okla. Terr., extinct) lost all territory to ROGER MILLS and to the creation of ELLIS and Non-County Area 1; DAY eliminated. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:145, 153)

GREER lost to creation of BECKHAM and JACKSON. GREER became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:146)

NOBLE gained from PAYNE; NOBLE became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:151)

Non-County Area 1 created from a small area of DAY (Okla. Terr., extinct) between the Indian boundary line on the north, and the south line of township 20 north in ranges 21 and 22 west. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:145)

PAYNE lost to NOBLE; PAYNE became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:152)

ROGER MILLS gained part of DAY (Okla. Terr., extinct), lost to creation of BECKHAM; DAY eliminated. ROGER MILLS came a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:153)

WOODS gained from WOODWARD, lost to creation of ALFALFA and MAJOR. WOODS became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:155-156)

WOODWARD lost to creation of ELLIS and HARPER, and lost to WOODS. WOODWARD became a county in the state of Oklahoma. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:156)

CANADIAN, CLEVELAND, CUSTER, DEWEY, GARFIELD, GRANT, KAY, KINGFISHER, KIOWA, LINCOLN, LOGAN, OKLAHOMA, PAWNEE, POTTAWATOMIE, and WASHITA became counties in the state of Oklahoma [no boundary changes]. (Okla. Constitution [1907], art. 17, sec. 8; Swindler, 8:141-156)

29 May 1908

ELLIS gained all of Non-County Area 1; Non-County Area 1 eliminated. (Okla. Laws 1907-1908, 1st sess., ch. 33/pp. 391-392)

22 May 1909

HARMON created from GREER by special election held 22 May 1909. (Morris, 133; Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145; Okla. Stats. Anno. 1988, title 19, p. 14)

1909

TULSA gained from WAGONER. (Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145)

1910

GREER gained from BECKHAM. (Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145)

An attempt was made to create SWANSON (proposed) from COMANCHE and KIOWA. The new county was declared illegal by the Oklahoma Supreme Court on 9 August 1911 [not mapped]. (Morris, 134; Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145; "Armstrong v. State," in Okla. Rpts., 29:161-170)

1911

GRADY gained from CADDO. (U. S. Census 1920, vol. 1, p. 145; Morris, 134)

12 December 1911

TILLMAN gained from KIOWA. (Tillman Co. Hist. Society, 2:401; Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145)

18 November 1912

COTTON created from COMANCHE by special election held 28 August 1912; governor's proclamation issued 18 November 1912. (Morris, 133-134; Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145; Okla. Stats. Anno. 1988, title 19, p. 14)

6 November 1913

Governor Cruce issued a proclamation calling for a referendum on the creation of SHAFFER (proposed) from CREEK, LINCOLN, and PAYNE. Election was held 7 February 1914 but the proposal did not pass [not mapped]. (Forbes, 23-29; Morris, 134)

1915

McINTOSH gained from HUGHES. (Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145)

1 July 1918

OKMULGEE gained from McINTOSH. (Special Census, Okmulgee County 1918, p. 9; Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145)

3 September 1918

TULSA gained from ROGERS. (History of Rogers County, 66-67, 75; Bureau of the Census 1920, vol. 1:145)

21 November 1924

WAGONER gained from CHEROKEE. (Wagoner County History, 120)

1925

LOVE gained from JEFFERSON. (Love County Heritage Comm., 73; Morris, 134-135)